Airliner Gallery

Boeing 737NG - Next Generation

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Boeing 737-800 Turkish Airlines / Sponsor of FC Barcelona livery

Turkish Airlines flies one Boeing 737-800 in a special FC Barcelona sponsor livery. The photo is taken at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

Boeing 737NG
737-600, 737-700, 737-800, 737-900

After the success of the 737-300, -400 and -500 Boeing developed a new family of 737-versions, designated '737NG' (Next Generation). It comprises four main models: 737-600, 737-700, 737-800 and 737-900.

Compared with the 737 Classics, the Next Generation aircraft have more efficient CFM56-7B turbofans, higher weights, more range, larger tail surfaces and a wing with greater chord, span and area. The modernised cockpit, which is identical for all four versions, can be programmed in the style of the 777 or the 737-300/400/500.

Boeing 737-700 TransaviaBoeing officially launched the first NG-version, the 737-700, late in 1993. This aircraft is about the same size as the 737-300 and seats 132-149 passengers depending on cabin configuration. It first flew on 9 February 1997 and a year later, the US low-cost carrier Southwest Airlines became the first user. The 737-700 is a head-on competitor of the Airbus A319.

The business jet version of the 737-700 is named 'BBJ1' (Boeing Business Jet 1). It has the fuselage of the 737-700 and the bigger wing and stronger landing gear of the larger 737-800. The BBJ1 was the first NG-version fitted with winglets to decrease drag, to reduce fuel consumption and to increase range.

The 737-700ER (Extended Range) is an airline-version based on the BBJ1. With more than 10,000 km (5,500 nm) the ER offers the range of an intercontinental airliner. This version was launched in January 2006 and the first example was delivered to All Nippon Airways (ANA) in February 2007. All Nippon started all-business class services with the aircraft between Tokyo and Mumbai. The 737-700C (Convertible) has a large main-deck cargo door and an interior from which the seats can be removed to make place for cargo. The launch customer of this version was the US Navy.


- 737-800 -

Boeing 737-800 Hapag-LloydThe second Next Generation 737 to fly was the 737-800. This aircraft is the successor of the 737-400, although it has a somewhat longer fuselage. The 737-800 flew for the first time on 31 July 1997 and in April 1998 the German holiday airline Hapag-Lloyd Flug became the first operator. The 737-800 competes with the Airbus A321 and airlines often ordered it to replace ageing Boeing 727s. The corporate jet version is named 'BBJ2'. The 737-800ERX offers extended range and is also available as a military variant. New 737-800s are built with winglets installed on the wingtips. Older aircraft often get winglets by retrofit. From the 737-800, Boeing developed the P-8 Poseidon for military duties like anti-submarine warfare an maritime patrol.


- 737-600 -

The smallest member of the 737NG family is the 737-600, which made its maiden flight on 22 January 1998. SAS Scandinavian Airlines was the first airline to operate this version. The 737-600 replaces the 737-500, but, like the competing Airbus A318, it appeared to be a slow seller. Boeing sold only 69 aircraft of this version and it is not being produced any more.


- 737-900 -

Boeing 737 Lion AirThe longest NG-version is the 737-900, which started flying on 3 August 2000. The first airline to operate the -900 was Alaska Airlines. The maximum number of passenger seats in this version is limited to 189 (the same as in the 737-800) because it has not enough doors and emergency exits to evacuate more passengers fast enough in case of an emergency. The improved extended range variant 737-900ER (Extra Range), has extra emergency doors so that it can seat up to 215 passengers in a single-class layout. The 737-900ER also offers more range. The 737-900 started selling slowly, but since the 737-900ER became available, sales results have improved dramatically. Boeing delivered the first 737-900ER to Lion Air in April 2007. The BBJ3 is the business jet variant of the 737-900ER.

Until mid 2016 Boeing has sold more than 7,100 737NG aircraft, including 148 BBJ's. The best selling version is the 737-800 with over 5,000 sales. Of the 737-700 almost 1,200 aircraft have been ordered, of the 737-900 around 550 and of the 737-600 only 69.


- 737 MAX -

The newest 737 generation, the fourth, is named '737 MAX'. Boeing began the development of the MAX after Airbus launched the A320 with new engines as 'A320neo'. Three new 737-versions are being developed: the 737 MAX 7, the 737 MAX 8 and the 737 MAX 9. They respectively replace the 737-700, -800 and -900. Boeing will not produce a replacement for the 737-600, but is considering a further stretched version, currently designated '737 MAX 10X'.

Boeing 737 MAX 8The most important improvement is the use of new CFM LEAP-1B turbofans, which together with small changes to the airframe, will result in a 14 per cent lower fuel consumption compared with the 737 Next Generation, according to Boeing. A new type of winglets has been developed, which is also available for installation on older 737s. Because the fan of the LEAP-1B engine is larger than that of earlier CFM-engines on the 737NG, Boeing had to lengthen the nose landing gear to keep the engine inlets clear from the ground.

Initially, the fuselage lengths remained unchanged, but in July 2016 Boeing announced to stretch the MAX 7 with 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) to accommodate two extra rows of seats (12 passengers). Maximum take off weight and range were also increased and Boeing added two extra overwing exits. The changes should make the aircraft more competitive with the 'clean-sheet' Bombardier CSeries.

Ryanair ordered a special variant of the 737 MAX 8 with extra seats, up to a total of 197. This version is designated 737 MAX 200 and has extra passenger doors to meet emergency evacuation rules.

The first version, the MAX 8, made its maiden flight on 29 January 2016 and received certification on 9 March 2017. The first delivery took place on 16 May 2017 to Malindo Air (Malaysia). The MAX 9 first flew on 13 April 2017 and deliveries of this version will begin in 2018. The first flight of the MAX 7 is scheduled for 2019.

The proposed 737 MAX 10X is intended as a competitor of the Airbus A321neo, which is selling much better than the MAX 9. The MAX 10 will have a further stretched fuselage and will be fitted with more powerful engines and an adapted landing gear.

Until Spring 2017 Boeing has sold more than 3,700 737 MAX aircraft, including 55 MAX 7s, around 2,000 MAX 8s and more than 400 MAX 9s (the rest is unspecified).

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Boeing 737-600
Specifications

Wingspan: 34.31 m (112 ft 7 in).
Length: 31.2 m (102 ft 6 in).
Height: 12.5 m (41 ft 2 in).

Empty weight:
37,378 kg (80,031 lb).
Max. take-off weight:
66,000 kg (145,500 lb).

Accommodation: 110-132 passengers.
Range: 5648 km (3,050 nm).
Operating speed: Mach 0.785.

Engines: two
CFM International CFM56-7B
(100.8 kN - 22,700 lb).

Boeing 737 Malev

A Boeing 737-600 of Malév in a special promotion livery approaches Brussels Nationaal Airport.

Boeing 737-700 KLM

A KLM Boeing 737-700 takes off from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

Boeing 737-700
Specifications

Wingspan: 34.31 m (112 ft 7 in)
(with winglets: 35.8 m (117 ft 5 in) )
Length: 33.6 m (110 ft 4 in)
Height: 12.5 m (41 ft 2 in)

Empty weight:
38,145 kg (84,100 lb)
Max. take-off weight:
70,080 kg (154,500 lb)

Accommodation:
126-149 passengers
Range: 6,230 km (3,365 nm)
Operating speed: Mach 0.785

Engines: two
CFM International CFM56-7B
(117 kN - 26,300 lb)


Boeing 737-800
Specifications

Wingspan: 34.31 m (112 ft 7 in)
(with winglets: 35.8 m (117 ft 5 in) )
Length: 39.5 m (129 ft 6 in)
Height: 12.6 m (41 ft 3 in)

Empty weight:
41,413 kg (91,108 lb)
Max. take-off weight:
79,010 kg (174,200 lb)

Accommodation: 162-189 passengers
Range: 5,665 km (3,060 nm)
Operating speed: Mach 0.785

Engines: two
CFM International CFM56-7B
(121.4 kN - 27,300 lb).

Boeing 737-800 Jetair TUI Airlines

A Boeing 737-800 of Jetair TUI Airlines approaches Brussels Zaventem (Nationaal) Airport.

Boeing 737 KLM

A Boeing 737-900 of KLM Royal Dutch Airlines approaches Amsterdam Schiphol Airport.

Boeing 737-900ER
Specifications

Wingspan: 34.31 m (112 ft 7 in),
(with winglets: 35.8 m (117 ft 5 in) )
Length: 42,1 m (138 ft 2 in)
Height: 12.6 m (41 ft 3 in)

Empty weight:
44,676 kg (98,495 lb)
Max. take-off weight: 79,010 kg (174,200 lb)

Accommodation: 180-215 passengers
Range: 5,925 km (3,200 nm)
Operating speed: Mach 0.785

Engines: two
CFM International CFM56-7B
(121.4 kN - 27,300 lb)




737-600

         

737-700

                     

                     

737-800

             

             

             


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737-900

         


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